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Archive for the ‘family’ Category

The Story of Jonah for Kids

Monday, July 29th, 2013 Posted in family, sermons | 49 Comments »

Here’s a video of me telling the story of Jonah to three of my granddaughters, on the beach.

Etiquette for Young Ladies

Tuesday, June 18th, 2013 Posted in family | 63 Comments »

Recently, Gina Thompson was teaching my granddaughters a lesson in etiquette and I crashed the party. Here’s the video.

Jonathan Laurie: “What’s It Going to Take?”

Tuesday, February 14th, 2012 Posted in family, video | 159 Comments »

Here is a special testimony from my youngest son, Jonathan, who was a prodigal for a few years.


It’s My Wife Cathe’s Birthday Today!

Monday, January 30th, 2012 Posted in family | 26 Comments »

It’s my wife’s birthday today!

She is a great woman who, to me, is a model of balance.
Her love for God runs deep, as does her love for her family.

She is totally dedicated to serving and glorifying God with her life. Yet, she takes care of herself and stays active and fit.

She always looks great too.

No question about it; she is a beautiful woman both inside and out and I am proud to call her my wife of 37 years.

As I think about it, what I have written is a paraphrase of what a woman ought to be according to Proverbs 31, and Cathe is just that.

So happy birthday, Cathe!

I have an announcement to make!

Tuesday, September 28th, 2010 Posted in family, photos | 35 Comments »

Welcome my newest Granddaughter into the world . . .
Alexandra Ryan Laurie, daughter of Jonathan and Brittni Laurie.
Alexandra is 7 pounds, 9 ounces.

I’m Off To Preach In New Zealand!

Wednesday, August 11th, 2010 Posted in family, Harvest Crusades, holidays, Pastor's corner, travel | 8 Comments »

Hey everyone!

I have been hanging out and just recharging a bit and getting ready for a trip to New Zealand!  We are hoping to do a Harvest Crusades event there next year, so we are holding a pre-crusade event this weekend in Auckland.

The mayor of the city is going to be there, along with some leading pastors from the city. I will speak two times and meet with a lot of people, so please pray that God guides and blesses our steps as we seek to take the gospel to the whole world.

In fact, we have held a number of events in New Zealand over the last few years, and they were very well-received. The people there are wonderful.

Joining me will be the Katinas and Phil Joel, formerly of The Newsboys. Phil is a “Kiwi,” a New Zealand native, so we know he will connect well.

It’s a 14-hour flight across the ocean, so you won’t hear from me for a while. And after this trip, I am taking a vacation with my family!

Talk to you soon.

Greg

I Am On James Dobson’s Radio Program Again Today

Tuesday, August 3rd, 2010 Posted in encouragement, family, Harvest Crusades, Pastor's corner | 1 Comment »

On today’s program, Dr. Dobson is playing my personal story of how I came to faith in Jesus Christ. To listen to the program, click here.

As you know, Dr. Dobson will be joining us at the Southern California Harvest this coming Sunday. I’m going to interview him and ask him questions about pain and suffering. Our focus on Sunday night is to provide an eternal perspective and a good dose of hope for those who are hurting.

Do you know someone who is in some kind of pain right now? Perhaps they heard bad news from their doctor. Or their marriage has fallen apart. Or maybe a loved one close to them has suddenly died,leaving them stunned.

You will want to bring them to hear this interview I will do with the good doctor, as well as a message I will give. We will be joined in music by Steven Curtis Chapman and MercyMe. Trust me,you will not want to miss this night.

Sunday’s event will be broadcast live on KFSH (95.9 FM) in Southern California, along with the first two nights of the Southern California Harvest. You will also be able to listen online at The Fish’s Web site, and watch the live and archived webcast at harvest.org.

Missing Christopher

Saturday, July 24th, 2010 Posted in family, Pastor's corner | 64 Comments »

July 24 is a date that marks time for me now. For it was on July 24, 2008, that my firstborn son, Christopher David Laurie, left this world at the age of 33.

Yes, it has been two years since he died. Two long years since I last saw his face and heard his voice. It seems like yesterday that he was here. Then again, it seems like forever since I last saw him.

I miss him so, so much

At first, people would approach with often clumsy attempts at offering sympathy. Other times, they would say just the right thing.

But after two years,very few people say anything at all. Only a handful. Perhaps they don’t know what to say.

Many will ask how a grieving person is doing. Are they over it yet? May I answer for all people who have lost loved ones, especially children?

No. We never will be “over it,” so please don’t ask that, if you please.

Some well-meaning but misguided Christians might say, “Don’t be sad. They are in heaven!” You must have never lost a loved if you say something like that. We know they are in heaven, and frankly, we want them here with us on Earth. So, we are sad.

When the apostle Paul’s friend and fellow worker Epaphroditus fell gravely ill, Paul wrote in a letter: “Indeed he was ill, and almost died. But God had mercy on him, and not on him only but also on me, to spare me sorrow upon sorrow” (Philippians 2:27 NIV).

So even Paul, who certainly had a strong faith and his theology straight, could hardly bear the thought of being separated from a close friend by death.

Are we getting through it?

The answer to that question is yes. Some days are better than others.

The most random things can trigger vivid memories that we did not even know were stored in the vaults of our imaginations. But like little home movies, they play out, and it both comforts and saddens.
But the thing we cannot do is forget. Nor do we want to,even if remembering causes pain.

Yes, our pain is deep, but know this: God is deeper still. He has kept His promises to me and my family. He has been there for us each step of the way, though it has been so very hard.

So we do not sorrow as those who have no hope. But we do sorrow. And we will continue to shed many tears. That’s because our love continues on for that person that has left us.

Yes, I am two years removed from the last time I saw Christopher. But I am also two years closer to when I will see him again.

This is my blessed hope. It is the hope of all of use who have had loved ones precede us to heaven.

Hope Beyond The Grave.

Friday, July 23rd, 2010 Posted in encouragement, family, Pastor's corner, sermons | 3 Comments »

Jesus said to her, “I am the resurrection and the life. He who believes in Me, though he may die, he shall live” (John 11:25).

The older we become, the more the question gnaws away at us: Is there life after death?

Sometimes, we ask that question earlier in life, when someone close to us dies without warning, and we come face-to-face with the uncomfortable fact of death.

Some Christians will say, “I’m going to go to heaven, so when I die, don’t weep for me.”

But death is hard for everyone, and there’s nothing wrong with feeling sorrow over the loss of someone you care about. It’s a natural part of the grieving process. As the Bible says, there is “a time to weep, and a time to laugh” (Ecclesiastes 3:4).

Death brings great sadness

Death even brought tears to the eyes of Jesus when His friend Lazarus died (see John 11:35). Of course, we know there is life beyond the grave for Christians. We know that life is not limited to this time on Earth, and that our stay on this planet is temporary. Even so, it is only natural to feel sorrow and loss for a Christian who has died.

When the apostle Paul’s friend and fellow worker Epaphroditus fell gravely ill, Paul wrote in a letter: “Indeed he was ill, and almost died. But God had mercy on him, and not on him only but also on me, to spare me sorrow upon sorrow” (Philippians 2:27  NIV). So even Paul, who certainly had a strong faith and his theology straight, could hardly bear the thought of being separated from a close friend by death.

Nevertheless, as believers, we know we will see that person again in heaven. That is God’s great gift to us. His Son Jesus personally intervened and turned death into victory.

The fear of dying

The writer of the Book of Hebrews put it like this:

Because God’s children are human beings—made of flesh and blood—Jesus also became flesh and blood by being born in human form. For only as a human being could he die, and only by dying could he break the power of the Devil, who had the power of death. Only in this way could he deliver those who have lived all their lives as slaves to the fear of dying. (Hebrews 2:14-15 NLT)

Don’t Be Afraid!

Wednesday, June 30th, 2010 Posted in encouragement, family, OC, Pastor's corner, sermons | 1 Comment »

I will be speaking this Thursday at Harvest: Orange County on the Lord’s Prayer. I hope you can join us for that. For more information, click here.

Also, this weekend at Harvest in Riverside, we will be having special Fourth of July services. We will also be launching our brand new fourth service, which will start at 5:00 P.M.

I will speak at all services and we will be joined by special musical guest Leeland!

Death is not the end

Jesus said to her, “I am the resurrection and the life. He who believes in Me, though he may die, he shall live” (John 11:25).

The older we become, the more this question will gnaw away at us: Is there life after death? Sometimes we ask that question earlier in life, when someone close to us dies without warning, and we come face-to-face with the uncomfortable fact of death.

Some Christians will say, “I’m going to go to heaven, so when I die, don’t weep for me.” But death is hard for everyone, and there’s nothing wrong with feeling sorrow over the loss of someone you care about. It’s a natural part of the grieving process. As the Bible says, there is “a time to weep, and a time to laugh” (Ecclesiastes 3:4). Death even brought tears to the eyes of Jesus when His friend Lazarus died (see John 11:35).

Of course, we know there is life beyond the grave for Christians. We know that life is not limited to this time on Earth, and that our stay on this planet is temporary. Even so, we will feel sorrow and loss for a Christian who has died.

The apostle Paul wrote about an incident where his friend and fellow worker Epaphroditus fell gravely ill. Paul wrote in a letter: “Indeed he was ill, and almost died. But God had mercy on him, and not on him only but also on me, to spare me sorrow upon sorrow” (Philippians 2:27 NIV). So even Paul, who certainly had strong faith and his theology straight, could hardly bear the thought of being separated from a close friend by death.

Nevertheless, as believers, we can know we will see that person again in heaven. That is God’s great gift to us. His Son Jesus personally intervened and turned death into victory.

The writer of the Book of Hebrews put it like this: “Because God’s children are human beings—made of flesh and blood—Jesus also became flesh and blood by being born in human form. For only as a human being could he die, and only by dying could he break the power of the Devil, who had the power of death. Only in this way could he deliver those who have lived all their lives as slaves to the fear of dying” (Hebrews 2:14-15 NLT).